Big Red Tooth – Dr Candice Schwartz

Where teeth and health meet

Diet and teeth.

How does diet affect your children’s teeth?

 

Diet is the key to a healthy, cavity free mouth. Many parents believe that choosing the best toothpaste will protect their young one’s mouths from holes and problems. This is unfortunately not the case. In order to fully understand the concept of diet affecting our teeth, you will need a short biology lesson.

 

Streptococci Mutans and Lactobacilli are the most common bacteria in the mouth responsible for tooth decay. When sugar is present in the mouth, these bacteria thrive off it, but unfortunately for us, through their own digestive process of these sugars, the waste products produced are acid. Specifically known as lactic acid, these by products leach out the calcium present in the teeth, thereby slowly weakening it. Over time, this demineralization (leaching out of calcium) of the tooth surface produces a hole. When sugars are present in high amounts, plaque forms. Plaque is the white/yellowish fur that we brush off our teeth every day. If plaque is left to ferment on the tooth surface, a cavity will result.

 

The goal in controlling plaque formation and cavities is to ultimately reduce the total intake of dietary sugar. It must be stressed however, sucrose (found in all sweets) is not the only sugar which damages teeth. Glucose (found in breads and rice), fructose (found in fruit), maltose (found in cereals and pastas) and lactose (found in milk) are all easily digested by mouth bacteria to form acid and destroy teeth. Dietary changes to alter the acidity of the mouth will directly reduce amount of plaque build up on the teeth, thereby reducing the chance of dental decay.

Our bodies do have a natural defense against acidity and this is saliva. Saliva acts as a natural cavity fighter. One of the key strategies in cavity reduction/elimination is to keep your mouth at a more alkaline pH (reduce bacterial acidity) throughout the day for longer periods. You do this by increasing saliva production and encouraging saliva production between meals.

This is how it works: When we eat a meal the pH of our mouths change in accordance to the type of food we have just eaten. Food containing higher amounts of carbohydrates and sugars will leave the mouth with an acidic pH, ranging from 1- 5. Increased saliva production will kick in and our saliva will buffer this acidity, slowly raising it back to the resting pH of approximately 7.5. If immediately after eating your main meal you have a sweet treat (piece of chocolate or a dessert), the acidity of your mouth does not change by much. Saliva is still produced and your mouth will quickly recover back to an alkaline pH, which does not allow sufficient time for bacterial colonization and acid production. The problem encountered, particularly with children, is sugary snacks given in between meals. Sugary snacks given an hour after a main meal will bring the pH of the mouth back down to an acidic level and bacteria will begin to thrive and produce more acid. It does not give the mouth time to recover from the acid overload and the mouth remains acidic for most of the day. This gives bacteria plenty of time to produce acidic waste and demineralize the teeth.

Give your children sugar free snacks between meals. Example: whole fruits and vegetables, nuts, sugar free (xylotol containing) chewing gum, cheese. Beware of dried fruit; this is very acidic and very high in sugar and not a good choice for in between meal snack.

Quick easy steps to making your child’s diet a tooth friendly diet

 

–     Allow sugar intake (sweets and treats) directly after main meals only. When sugar is given between meals as a snack, this leads to a high incidence of decay. The frequency of sugar intake has more impact than the amount of sugar intake. Between meal snacks should contain no sugar.

 

–      The best type of sweet for a child is chocolate. Sticky sweets like toffees/fizzers/jelly sweets/suckers stick in between and around the teeth and result in destruction of the teeth for a much longer duration as the sugar lies in and around each tooth. It is difficult to clean this sugar off the teeth and they are extremely acid producing.

–      Beware of dried fruit; this is not a good snack. It has a very high sugar content and high acidity. It not only causes dental decay but acid erosion of the teeth.

–      End each meal with a small piece of cheese/some milk/xylotol chewing gum. This neutralizes the mouth and stimulates saliva production.

–      Limit fruit juice intake to ½ a cup per day (if needed). I always advise parents to try to eliminate all juice and sodas from the diet. They do not give hydration. Children should only drink water. If your child does drink a soda/fruit juice, ensure they drink it through a straw, so it bypasses the mouth and the teeth and is swallowed immediately.

–      All babies must be weaned off their nighttime milk bottle/breast feed by the age of 1. At 1 year old they no longer require the nutrition of the milk during the night, as their diet is predominantly solid food. If your child still enjoys the bottle as a pacifier at night, put only water in this bottle. Rampant dental decay results if children are kept on a bottle/breast past one year of age.

–      Never add sugar/honey to rooibos tea. This sugar will rapidly decay teeth, especially if given through a bottle/sippy cup.

Dental decay is a preventable disease. Diet is at the centre of this preventative concept. Without a lower sugar intake, you cannot expect a cavity free mouth. The acidity produced by sugar does not only affect the mouth. This type of acidic environment in the body allows viruses/bacteria/infections to thrive and leaves the body more susceptible to disease. Reducing/eliminating sugar from your child’s diet will have positive effects in all the bodily systems. Change their eating habits today.

 

 

 

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Do I need to floss my child’s teeth?

Flossing one’s teeth is probably one of the most tricky skills to master in this lifetime and that is why most people do not do it. However consider this analogy: after a day of gardening and digging in the dirt with your hands, they are covered in mud and sand. You go to the basin and wash your hands vigorously with your most potent hand soap. You rinse the soapy water off only to reveal your finger nails filled with dirt underneath. Only when you take a nail brush a scrub under your nails is all the dirt removed. Imagine if you just left all that dirt and bacteria to live and remain under your nails indefinitely…

The same applies to your mouth and especially your child’s mouth. We eat and drink all day long, bathing our teeth in sugars and carbohydrates which allows bacteria to thrive and easily attach to all the surfaces of the teeth. After a rigorous scrubbing with the toothbrush, you are only removing the plaque/food/debris from the outer surface of your teeth; you are only cleaning 60% of your tooth surfaces. This leave 40% of tooth surfaces uncleaned, covered in plaque and susceptible to breakdown by bacteria. Flossing removes the bacteria below the gums. Decay occurring between the teeth is the second most common site of tooth decay in children. Decay between the teeth of children is very difficult to detect and even more difficult to treat.

The types of cavities that develop as a result of not flossing are in my opinion “silent killers”. The hole starts directly in between two teeth and slowly burrows into the center of the tooth. You are usually completely unaware that this hole exists because you cannot feel it with your tongue and the pain is not felt because the open tooth structure is shrouded between the adjacent teeth or compacted with food (nummy!). Only once the hole has increased in size enough, does the unsupported covering of enamel fracture/cave in. This is when people decide to visit me; once it is too late and the tooth generally requires a root treatment/extraction/pulpotomy(in primary teeth).

Silent destruction that ultimately leads to abscess development

The other important reason for flossing is to prevent gum disease from occurring in the gum areas between the teeth. Brushing alone is not adequate to keep the mouth healthy and free of disease. Bad breath is often caused by masses of bacteria/plaque breeding and thriving in the areas between the teeth. Plaque matures every 24 hours, so it is imperative to break this cycle and floss every day. Bleeding gums when you floss is a sign that you need to floss more!

Example of how to floss around the gum line

To prevent these disaster cavities from developing and to prevent gum disease you need to clean away the plaque/bacteria/food that accumulates under and around the gumline in between the teeth. You do this with dental floss, every night, last thing before bedtime. Flossing must be initiated in children from the age of 2 years. Even if their molar teeth have not grown out yet, start to floss around the mouth each night and entrench this habit into their daily routine. This will set them up for a lifetime of good oral health.

You only need to floss the teeth you want to keep…

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HealOzone Revealed! Say goodbye to cavities and goodbye to painful dental visits

HealOzone is the best news for any patient who does not like visiting the dentist. Oxygen kills the decay causing bacteria that cause dental caries. These bacteria (known as anaerobic bacteria) thrive in an environment where there is little or no oxygen. Cavities develop as the environment below the surface of the tooth becomes acidic. Ozone not only kills the acid-making bacteria, it also neutralizes their acidic waste. Many municipal drinking water systems kill bacteria in the water using ozone. Also ozone is at least ten times stronger than chlorine as a disinfectant. The medical community — especially in Europe — have been using ozone for decades to speed up wound-healing and to treat a variety of diseases.

The new environment that occurs following the bio-chemical change (from acidic to alkaline) in the lesion allows minerals to flow back into the tooth, hardening and reversing the effects of decay. Early cavities can heal. The minerals to assist this repair can come slowly from the saliva or much quicker from mineral-rich solutions soaked into the teeth following the ozone treatment. Research seems to indicate that once a tooth is remineralized, it is very unlikely the decay will come back. Multiple ozone treatments over a period of months can improve chances even better.

Ozone is used to treat early tooth decay before it turns into a big hole. Once the affected tooth surface has been treated with the ozone, a composite filling can be placed straight away, directly onto the treated tooth surface. NO injections. No drilling. NO PAIN.

Ozone therapy is an amazing tool for treating small areas of decay, however when cavities have become much larger, ozone treatment alone will not suffice as the only treatment. However, after the decay on these larger cavities has been removed, ozone may be used to sterilize the tooth surface. This will allow for remineralization of the tooth surface beneath the restoration and will reduce the occurrence of secondary decay beneath restorations.

Ozone may also be used to treat oral ulcers, cold sores and gum disease. When applied to the affected tissues, after just one treatment symptoms will reduce significantly and healing will progress at a much faster rate. After a second and third ozone treatment, healing will often be complete.

Dental ozone is right here, right now, and poised to make us look at traditional dentistry with a new set of eyes!

More info : http://www.quintpub.com/display_detail.php3?psku=B8830

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